AACI Update

December 2018

Headlines

AACI Debuts New Website

AACI Debuts New Website AACI recently launched a redesigned website, which will serve as a powerful tool to support communication between AACI and our 98 cancer center members. 

The responsive, mobile-friendly interface offers enhanced viewing across devices, and real-time updates allow AACI to showcase its full range of events, programs, and initiatives. The website will also provide a platform for Dr. Roy Jensen’s presidential initiative: a library of sample legislation for AACI members.
 

Read More

CRI: From 'Initiative' to 'Innovation'

CRI: From 'Initiative' to 'Innovation'

Entering its eleventh year, AACI's Clinical Research Initiative (CRI) has been renamed Clinical Research Innovation, to mark its popularity and success. Earlier this year, AACI sought recommendations from its members and board of directors for renaming CRI. The decision was rooted in a desire to reflect the program’s longevity: with over a decade of consistent growth, CRI has expanded beyond its status as an “initiative.”

Read More

eRegulatory Working Group Established

While most AACI cancer centers have in place a regulatory file system—either paper or an electronic system for the filing and version control of a trial’s required regulatory information—many utilize non-standard file-naming conventions. AACI Clinical Research Innovation (CRI) has established an eRegulatory working group to address the challenges that non-standard file names create.

Read More

New Congress Brings New Opportunities

The 116th Congress will convene on January 3, 2019 with nine new members of the United States Senate and 92 new members of the House of Representatives. The incoming Congress is the most demographically diverse in history and trends historically younger with an average age of 49 years old.

With new faces in Washington, AACI cancer centers have a great opportunity to set the stage for a positive relationship with these leaders. Now is the time for your cancer center to invite newly-elected officials in your state or region to your institution, introduce them to faculty and staff, educate them on novel technologies, and offer a tour.

Read More

Nominations Sought for Champion for Cures Award

Nominations Sought for Champion for Cures Award

Nominations are now being accepted for the 2019 Champion for Cures Award.

AACI created the Champion for Cures Award to recognize an individual or individuals who, through direct financial support of an AACI cancer center, demonstrate exceptional leadership in advancing cancer research and care and in inspiring others to do the same.

Read More

PCLI Welcomes New Steering Committee Members

PCLI Welcomes New Steering Committee Members

Four new members have been selected to join AACI’s Physician Clinical Leadership Initiative (PCLI) steering committee: Andrew Chapman, DO, FACP, chief of medical services, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health; David Gaffney, MD, senior director of clinical research, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah; Richard Goldberg, MD, FACP, FASCO, director, WVU Cancer Institute; and Charles Ryan, MD, director, Division of Hematology, Oncology & Transplantation, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota.

Read More

Webinar: Minority Recruitment to Clinical Trials

Webinar: Minority Recruitment to Clinical Trials

The AACI Physician Clinical Leadership Initiative (PCLI) will present a webinar on minority recruitment to clinical trials on Thursday, December 13 at 12:00 pm eastern. Facilitated by Ruben A. Mesa, MD, FACP, director of UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, the webinar will address topics including barriers to trial enrollment that may disproportionately impact Latino patients and strategies to facilitate clinical trial participation among diverse populations.

Read More

Winter Break for AACI Update

Winter Break for AACI Update

Please let us know what you think about the new format of the December 2018 AACI Update! 
AACI Update will take a holiday break in January, but we will be working to improve the February 1, 2019 issue based on your feedback.

Read More

News from the Centers

Johnson Named Among Women Power 100

Johnson Named Among Women Power 100
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center
Roswell Park's president and CEO, Candace S. Johnson, PhD, has been named to a new list of the most powerful female leaders in New York. City & State, a media company covering government and politics in New York, included Dr. Johnson on its New York Women Power 100 list, which honors the 100 most influential women in government, public affairs, business, culture, and social services.
 

Read More

Pediatrician is Inaugural Pagano Scholar

Pediatrician is Inaugural Pagano Scholar
Indiana University Melvin & Bren Simon Cancer Center
A leading pediatrician will be the inaugural Chuck and Tina Pagano Scholar at Indiana University School of Medicine. Rachel Katzenellenbogen, MD, will hold that title as well as associate professor of pediatrics. She is also a member of the Cancer Prevention and Control research program at the Indiana University Melvin & Bren Simon Cancer Center and a member of the Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research.
 

Read More

Lisenbee Elected to APSHO Board

Lisenbee Elected to APSHO Board
Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center
Kelly Lisenbee, DNP, ANP-C, AOCN, adult nurse practitioner, Department of Urologic Surgery, was recently elected to the board of directors for the Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology (APSHO).
 

Read More

Lu-Yao Awarded by Geriatric Oncology Society

Lu-Yao Awarded by Geriatric Oncology Society
Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health
Grace Lu-Yao, PhD, associate director of population science at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center – Jefferson Health, has been honored with the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2018 Nursing and Allied Health (NAH) Investigator Award at the SIOG 2018 Annual Conference.
 

Read More

St. Clair Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

UK Markey Cancer Center
University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researcher Daret St. Clair, PhD, has been named the 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient from the Society for Redox Biology and Medicine (SfRBM). St. Clair received the award and gave a feature lecture at the SfRBM’s 25th Annual Conference in Chicago in November.
 

Read More

Back to top of news from centers

$20 Million Gift Boosts Multiple Myeloma Research

$20 Million Gift Boosts Multiple Myeloma Research
Siteman Cancer Center
Scottrade brokerage founder Rodger Riney and his wife, Paula, have donated $20 million to Washington University researchers at Siteman Cancer Center, establishing the Paula C. and Rodger O. Riney Blood Cancer Research Initiative Fund. To date, the Rineys have given $25 million to Washington University scientists with broad expertise in multiple myeloma, genomics, immunology and immunotherapy, imaging, and pharmacogenomics to develop promising new treatments for the disease.
 

Read More

$11.5 Million SPORE Grant Supports Innovation in Leukemia Research

$11.5 Million SPORE Grant Supports Innovation in Leukemia Research
Siteman Cancer Center
Washington University researchers at Siteman Cancer Center have received an $11.5 million Specialized Program in Research Excellence (SPORE) grant to further high-level investigations into leukemia and related blood cancers. The goal is to develop biomarkers and treatments for leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes and to develop and promote innovative translational leukemia research. Daniel C. Link, MD, is the principal investigator.
 

Read More

Duke Team Receives $10.8 Million From NCI

Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center
The National Cancer Institute awarded $10.8 million to Duke Cancer Institute researchers as part of the Human Tumor Atlas Network, which will work to build a visual model of cancer tumors. The Duke team, led by Shelley Hwang, MD, and Jeffrey R. Marks, PhD, will develop a three-dimensional molecular characterization of pre-cancerous growths in the breast to better understand how breast cancers develop. Co-principal investigators are from Stanford and Arizona State universities.
 

Read More

Grant Awarded to Discover Best Way to Deliver Genetic Services to Primary Care Patients

Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah was recently awarded a prestigious team science grant through the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Moonshot initiative to study genetic counseling, genetic communication and genetic services to patients. The grant is expected to provide more than $5 million in research project support over the next five years.
 

Read More

Grant to Establish Center for Early Detection of Liver Cancer

UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center
Researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center received a $3.5 million, five-year grant from the NIH to create a center dedicated to developing an effective and affordable blood-based cancer-screening test to help detect liver cancer early.
 

Read More

$2.3 Million Supports Studies on Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

$2.3 Million Supports Studies on Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy
Indiana University Melvin & Bren Simon Cancer Center
Jill Fehrenbacher, PhD, and Mark Kelley, PhD, are recipients of a five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute, which will enable them to continue their studies on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). They will test the effectiveness of a small, targeted molecule called APX3330 to prevent or reverse CIPN caused by cancer drugs in tumor-bearing mice.
 

Read More

$2.1 Million Grant to Study Cognitive Decline During Chemotherapy

$2.1 Million Grant to Study Cognitive Decline During Chemotherapy
VCU Massey Cancer Center
With the help of a $2.1 million grant, Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and VCU School of Nursing researchers will study how a gene that regulates estrogen and neurotransmitter levels could be tied to cognitive decline in patients undergoing chemotherapy for breast and endometrial cancers. Theresa Swift-Scanlan, PhD, is the primary investigator. 
 

Read More

Husband and Wife Doctors Receive $1.8 Million to Test New Breast Cancer Approach

Husband and Wife Doctors Receive $1.8 Million to Test New Breast Cancer Approach
University of Virginia Cancer Center
The NIH has awarded a husband-and-wife team at UVA Cancer Center more than $1.8 million to improve radiation therapy and breast surgery for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Radiation oncologist Dr. Timothy Showalter and breast cancer surgeon Dr. Shayna L. Showalter are leading an interdisciplinary effort to evaluate a technique they developed at UVA called Precision Breast intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT).
 

Read More

McMahon Receives Pancreatic Cancer Collective Grant

McMahon Receives Pancreatic Cancer Collective Grant
Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah
Martin McMahon, PhD, has received a grant from the Pancreatic Cancer Collective, the strategic partnership of the Lustgarten Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer. The funding will be used to test combined blockade of intracellular signaling via the RAS pathway, and autophagic recycling of the cells’ interior contents.
 

Read More

Back to top of news from centers

Omuro Named New Neuro-Oncology Chief

Omuro Named New Neuro-Oncology Chief
Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine

Antonio Omuro, MD, has been appointed the new chief of neuro-oncology and a leader for the Brain Tumor Program at Smilow Cancer Hospital. Dr. Omuro started his new position December 1, 2018.

Read More

Whetstine Joins Cancer Epigenetics Program

Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple Health

Epigenetics researcher Johnathan Whetstine, PhD, joined Fox Chase as program leader of the Cancer Epigenetics Program. Previously, Dr. Whetstine served as vice chair of the Epigenetics Program at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Read More

Dlugosz to Oversee Basic Science Research

Dlugosz to Oversee Basic Science Research
University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center
The University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center has named Andrzej Dlugosz, MD, associate director for basic science research. Dr. Dlugosz currently co-leads the Rogel Cancer Center’s cancer biology program.
 

Read More

Back to top of news from centers

CAR T Clinical Trial Opens for Patients with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer That Has Spread to Brain

City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center

Women with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to the brain need more treatment options, and City of Hope and Mustang Bio Inc. are meeting that challenge. A new City of Hope chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell trialthe first to focus on HER2-postive breast cancer patients with brain metastasesis now enrolling potential participants.

Read More

Anti-CD47 Cancer Therapy Safe, Shows Promise in Small Clinical Trial

Anti-CD47 Cancer Therapy Safe, Shows Promise in Small Clinical Trial
Stanford Cancer Institute
A novel immunotherapy appears safe for use in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, according to a Phase I multicenter clinical trial led by a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Although some patients showed signs of a transitory anemia or reactions at the injection site, the treatment posed few significant side effects. Ranjana Advani, MD, is lead author of the study.
 

Read More

Decrease in Specific Gene 'Silencing' Molecules Linked with Pediatric Brain Tumors

Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University

Experimenting with lab-grown brain cancer cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a shortage of specific, tiny molecules that silence certain genes is linked to the development and growth of pediatric brain tumors known as low-grade gliomas.

Read More

New Way That Skin Stops Tumor Growth Identified

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

In newly published work, Hutch researchers show that skin stem cells in mice respond to what ought to have been a cancer-causing mutation by opting to differentiate, or specialize, instead of renewing themselves. Because differentiated skin cells eventually slough off, the strategy appears to allow skin to jettison dangerous mutations without disrupting its function.

Read More

Standard Myeloma Treatment Shows Itself as an Immunotherapy

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

New research suggests that doctors may have had an incorrect understanding of how a standard treatment for an incurable blood cancer works to prolong lives. The therapy, based around high doses of chemotherapy or radiation, looks like it may actually be an immunotherapy — that is, a treatment that stimulates the patients’ own immune systems to help fight their cancers.

Read More

Minimally-Invasive Surgery Linked with Worse Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer Versus Open Hysterectomy

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
When comparing standard-of-care surgical options for women with early-stage cervical cancer, two studies led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discovered that minimally-invasive radical hysterectomy is associated with higher recurrence rates and worse overall survival, compared to abdominal radical hysterectomy.
 

Read More

When Melanoma Spreads to Brain, Patients with BRAF, MEK Mutations Can Find Novel Treatment

When Melanoma Spreads to Brain, Patients with BRAF, MEK Mutations Can Find Novel Treatment
The University of Arizona Cancer Center

In partnership with Spirita Oncology, LLC, Hani Babiker, MD, and the Early Phase Clinical Trials Program have opened a clinical trial for patients with brain metastases from BRAF- or MEK-mutated melanoma. Participants will receive an investigational MEK inhibitor called E6201, a "targeted" drug.

Read More

Rural Residents at Much Higher Larynx Cancer Risk

Rural Residents at Much Higher Larynx Cancer Risk
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple Health
According to a new study, individuals living in rural areas are at greater risk of developing laryngeal cancer compared to those living in urban areas, though overall survival did not differ significantly between the two groups. Miriam N. Lango, MD, FACS, led the study. 
 

Read More

Targeting Rhabdomyosarcoma, a Rare Cancer with Few Treatment Options

Targeting Rhabdomyosarcoma, a Rare Cancer with Few Treatment Options
The University of Arizona Cancer Center

The most comprehensive assessment of rhabdomyosarcoma drug targets was published. Justina McEvoy, PhD, a first author, joined the study when she was a postdoctoral fellow at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and continued to contribute after joining the the University of Arizona Cancer Center in 2014.

Read More

Cold Therapy Offers Promising Prevention Against Taxane-Induced Dermatologic Events

Cold Therapy Offers Promising Prevention Against Taxane-Induced Dermatologic Events
GW Cancer Center

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) have found that cooling therapies such as cold caps, scalp cooling systems, frozen gloves, and frozen socks may offer the best protection against the adverse effects of taxane-based chemotherapy. Adam Friedman, MD, is senior author on the study. 

Read More

Spread of Deadly Eye Cancer Halted in Cells, Animals

Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University

By comparing genetic sequences in the eye tumors of children whose cancers spread with tumors that didn’t, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that a domino effect in cells is responsible for the cancer spreading. Their experiments suggest that blocking part of the chain of events—which they successfully accomplished in zebra fish and human cells—stops the growth and spread of the eye tumor cells.

Read More

Link Identified Between DNA-Protein Binding, Cancer Onset

Stanford Cancer Institute

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators at other institutions have identified a link between how proteins bind to our DNA and how cancer develops. This finding may allow researchers to predict cancer pathways and long-term patient outcomes.

Read More

Unique Research Models Immune Responses in Cellular Immunotherapies

VCU Massey Cancer Center

In the Cellular Immunotherapy and Transplantation Program at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, scientists are pursuing a cross-collaborative effort that could potentially change the way cellular immunotherapies such as stem-cell transplantation and CAR T-cell therapies are performed. This grassroots research is funded primarily through VCU Massey pilot grants, and it is culminating in a first-of-its-kind body of work that provides a detailed, quantitative view of how the immune system responds to cellular therapies.

Read More

As Vaping Increased in Popularity, Use of Cigarettes Declined

Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

A comprehensive analysis examining the relationship between vaping and smoking among youth and young adults finds that cigarette smoking dramatically decreased between 2013 and 2017, just as e-cigarette use became more popular.

Read More

Fecal Transplant Effective Against Immunotherapy-Induced Colitis

Fecal Transplant Effective Against Immunotherapy-Induced Colitis
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

For the first time, gut bacteria transplanted from healthy donors was used to successfully treat patients suffering from colitis caused by immune checkpoint inhibitors. A study from MD Anderson Cancer Center, led by Yinghong Wang, MD, PhD, suggests fecal microbiota transplantation is worth investigating in clinical trials to address this common immunotherapy side effect. 

Read More

A Genetic Driver of Deadly Prostate Cancer Identified

Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
A new study has identified a novel molecular driver of lethal prostate cancer, along with a molecule that could be used to attack it. The findings were made in laboratory mice. Researchers analyzed genetic and molecular data from cancer patients in a large database. They found evidence of elevated activity of the molecule Onecut2 in tumors of patients whose prostate cancer resisted hormone therapy.
 

Read More

How Melanoma Evades Targeted Therapies

Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health
A commonly used targeted therapy for metastatic melanomas works by attacking melanomas with mutations in the BRAF gene that make them susceptible to RAF-inhibiting drugs. However, many cancers quickly become resistant to the treatment. Now researchers at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center – Jefferson Health have discovered how one of the mechanisms of that resistance works, a finding that could lead to designing more effective combination therapies.
 

Read More

New 'SLICE' Tool Can Massively Expand Immune System's Cancer-Fighting Repertoire

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
UC San Francisco researchers have devised a CRISPR-based system called SLICE, which will allow scientists to rapidly assess the function of each and every gene in “primary” immune cells — those drawn directly from patients. The new method provides researchers with a powerful tool that will guide their decision-making when determining how best to engineer immune cells to fight cancer and a host of other diseases. 
 

Read More

Targeting MC1R in Metastatic Melanoma

University of Colorado Cancer Center
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study describes a genetic change common to 80 percent of human melanomas, the most deadly form of skin cancer, and also describes a molecule that seeks out cells marked by this genetic change. 
 

Read More

Ultrasound Ovarian Cancer Screening Improves Survival

Ultrasound Ovarian Cancer Screening Improves Survival
UK Markey Cancer Center
A new University of Kentucky study shows that annual ultrasound screening of at-risk, asymptomatic women increases the survival rates of women with type I and type II epithelial ovarian cancer. The results come from the UK Markey Cancer Center’s Ovarian Cancer Screening Program, a 30-year study initiated in 1987 by gynecologic oncologist John van Nagell, Jr., MD, and the UK College of Medicine. 
 

Read More

Researchers ID 'Achilles Heel' of Drug-Resistant Tumors

Researchers ID 'Achilles Heel' of Drug-Resistant Tumors
UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
UC San Francisco scientists have figured out why some lung cancers become drug-resistant after initially responding to targeted therapies. In the process, they devised a new two-pronged approach that yields an effective treatment for these cancers in the laboratory and holds tremendous promise for the future of precision medicine, they said. Sourav Bandyopadhyay, PhD, is senior author of the new study.

Read more ...

Will Tarloxotinib Finally Break the HER2 Barrier in Lung Cancer?

University of Colorado Cancer Center
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows the promise of an innovative new strategy against HER2-driven lung cancers (with EGFR involvement, which is also a well-known driver of lung cancer). Tarloxotinib, a potent HER2/EGFR inhibitor, is unique in that the drug only becomes active in low-oxygen conditions, such as those commonly found in tumor tissue. 

Read more ...

New Checkpoint Inhibitor Shows Promise in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Trial

The University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center
By combining the experimental anti-cancer antibody known as 5F9 (Hu5F9-G4) with the established anti-cancer antibody rituximab, researchers managing a small phase-1b clinical trial were able to induce a positive response in 11 out of 22 people with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Read more ...

Stephenson Cancer Center Leads Ovarian Cancer Study

Stephenson Cancer Center Leads Ovarian Cancer Study
Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma
Kathleen Moore, MD, a physician-scientist at Stephenson Cancer Center at OU Medicine, co-directed an international clinical trial that yielded findings considered unprecedented in the field of gynecological cancer. The research is groundbreaking because it showed that a targeted cancer therapy helped a subset of women with ovarian cancer live three years longer without a cancer recurrence than those who did not receive the therapy. 

Read more ...

Genomic Study Discovers 40 New Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Cancer

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
The most comprehensive genome-wide association study, or GWAS, of colorectal cancer risk to date, has discovered 40 new genetic variants and validated 55 previously identified variants that signal an increased risk of colon cancer. The study, led by a team of investigators at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, also has identified the first rare protective variant for sporadic colorectal cancer. 

Read more ...

Back to top of news from centers

Developing Patient-Centered Palliative Care From Diagnosis to End of Life

LIVESTRONG Cancer Institutes, University of Texas Austin/Dell Medical School
In December, The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School will launch an innovative cancer care model called the CaLM (cancer life re-imagined) Clinic as part of its new cancer center, the Livestrong Cancer Institutes. The goal of the Livestrong Cancer Institutes and the CaLM Clinic is to provide a holistic approach to caring for patients with cancer from their initial cancer diagnosis and treatment throughout survivorship, including palliative and supportive care.
 

Read More

Polish University Partnership

Polish University Partnership
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center
Roswell Park has formed an academic cooperation agreement with the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland. The collaboration will see the two centers exchanging staff, students, and scientific resources to jointly undertake basic, translational, and clinical research to develop cancer therapies. 
 

Read More

Human Images From the World's First Total-Body Medical Scanner Unveiled

UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

EXPLORER, the world’s first medical imaging scanner that can capture a 3-D picture of the whole human body at once, has produced its first scans. The brainchild of UC Davis scientists Simon Cherry, PhD, and Ramsey Badawi, PhD, EXPLORER is a combined positron emission tomography and x-ray computed tomography scanner that can image the entire body at the same time. Because the machine captures radiation far more efficiently than other scanners, EXPLORER can produce an image in as little as one second and, over time, produce movies that can track specially tagged drugs as they move around the entire body.
 

Read More

Back to top of news from centers

Cancer Center Jobs

Clinical Trial Protocol/Operations Coordinator I
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Read more
Clinical Trial Protocol/Operations Coordinator II
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Read more
External Research Coordinator
Moffitt Cancer Center
Read more
Administrative Director, Clinical Research Office
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center
Read more
Director, Cancer Center Research
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School
Read more
Research Clinical Specialist (RN)
Moffitt Cancer Center
Read more

Meeting Announcements

AACI/AACR Hill Day 2019

April 30, 2019
Washington, DC

11th Annual AACI CRI Meeting

July 9, 2019
Chicago, IL

2019 AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting

October 20, 2019
Washington, DC
Back to top