AACI Update | September 2019

Headlines

IU Simon Earns Comprehensive Designation

IU Simon Earns Comprehensive Designation The Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center has achieved the highest recognition from the National Cancer Institute: Comprehensive Cancer Center, signifying research excellence. Overall, the center received an "outstanding" rating from NCI reviewers and was awarded a five-year, $13.8 million grant that supports the center’s research programs and shared facilities. That marks an increase of 43 percent from the previous five-year funding period. Patrick J. Loehrer, Sr., MD, is director of the center.
 

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Three Cancer Center Directors Elected to AACI Board


 
Carlos L. Arteaga, MD, S. Gail Eckhardt, MD, FASCO, and Caryn Lerman, PhD, were elected by their peers to serve three-year terms on AACI’s Board of Directors. Dr. Arteaga was appointed director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center at UT Southwestern Medical Center in 2017 and Dr. Eckhardt became the inaugural director of the LIVESTRONG Cancer Institutes of the Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin, the same year. Dr. Lerman was appointed director of the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center in March 2019. 
 

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CAR T Symposium, Other Meetings, Set for AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting

CAR T Symposium, Other Meetings, Set for AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting

The 2019 AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting, October 20-22 in Washington, DC, will include additional meetings for AACI’s Physician Clinical Leadership Initiative (PCLI) and Government Relations (GR) Forum, as well as a CAR T Symposium. All events are included in the regular annual meeting registration. However, attendees must register online prior to the meetings or modify a previous registration. Please note: the following meetings are only open to AACI members. Annual meeting registration rates will increase on Friday, September 20.

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New Committee Chairs to Lead Three AACI Programs


AACI’s Clinical Research Innovation, Government Relations (GR) Forum, and Physician Clinical Leadership Initiative (PCLI) welcome new committee leaders who will provide guidance to the association in the areas of cancer center management and public policy. Theresa L. Werner, MD, John DeMuro, and Claire F. Verschraegen, MS, MD, FACP, will begin their terms during the 2019 AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting, October 20-22, in Washington, DC.
 

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AACI Welcomes New Corporate Roundtable Members


AACI extends a warm welcome to its newest corporate members: AbbVie, Kite, and Pfizer. Launched in 2012, the AACI Corporate Roundtable creates opportunities for open discussion around important issues between industry representatives and leaders of academic cancer centers.  
 

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Register Today for PCLI Hereditary Cancer Program Webinars

Register Today for PCLI Hereditary Cancer Program Webinars AACI's Physician Clinical Leadership Initiative (PCLI) will present a two-part webinar series on hereditary cancer programs and cancer risk assessment. The first webinar will focus on models of testing for pancreatic, breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers and will be held on Wednesday, October 2 at 11:00 am ET. The second part of the series will highlight models of testing for colon and hematologic cancers and informed consent and will be held on Wednesday, November 13 at 11:00 am ET.
 

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News from the Centers

Gerson Elected to National Academy of Inventors as Senior Member

Gerson Elected to National Academy of Inventors as Senior Member
Case Comprehensive Cancer Center
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 54 academic inventors to its Spring 2019 class of senior members, including Stan Gerson, MD, director of Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Gerson, who also directs the National Center for Regenerative Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, holds 16 U.S. patents for stem cells and drug discovery. His research focuses on the relationship between stem cells, DNA, and cancer.
 

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Hallahan Named Senior Member of NAI

Hallahan Named Senior Member of NAI
Siteman Cancer Center
Washington University radiation oncologist Dennis E. Hallahan, MD, of Siteman Cancer Center, has been named a senior member of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Dr. Hallahan, who also heads the Department of Radiation Oncology, is being recognized for producing "technologies that have brought, or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society."
 

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Oncologist to Receive Medal for Leukemia Research

Oncologist to Receive Medal for Leukemia Research
The University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of Chicago Medicine oncologist and professor Richard A. Larson, MD, will receive the 2019 Henry M. Stratton Medal from the American Society of Hematology. Dr. Larson, director of UChicago Medicine’s Hematologic Malignancies Clinical Research Program, has dedicated his career to designing groundbreaking therapeutic trials for patients with leukemia. 
 

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More Than $15 Million in New Funding Secured for Cancer Research

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have received more than a dozen recent grant awards totaling more than $15.4 million. These awards, from both government agencies and private funders, will fuel research in treating diseases like prostate, breast, colon, and lung cancer, as well as less-common cancers like multiple myeloma and esophageal cancer. They include the first National Institutes of Health funding to study a new electronic tobacco device, plus new state funds supporting Roswell Park’s role in the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Moonshot initiative.
 

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Grant Awarded for CAR T-Cell Trial for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer That Has Spread to Brain

Grant Awarded for CAR T-Cell Trial for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer That Has Spread to Brain
City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center
Saul Priceman, PhD, and his research team have received a $9.28 million award from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to support a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell Phase I clinical trial for the treatment of women with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to the brain.
 

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$7.8 Million Awarded to Expand Clinical Trials Access

Siteman Cancer Center
Washington University physicians at Siteman Cancer Center have received a six-year, $7.8 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to play a leading role in designing, conducting and enrolling patients in clinical trials through the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network. The funding acknowledges Siteman’s continued role as a Lead Academic Participating Site in the network.
 

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NCI Grant Will Support Community Outreach and Research

Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center
Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center has been selected as a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). Established with a $5.33 million grant, Georgetown Lombardi’s "National Capital Area Minority/Underserved NCORP," or NCA-NCORP, joins a nationwide network that aims to bring cancer clinical trials and cancer care delivery studies to people living in underserved areas.
 

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Grant to Fund Study of Family Caregiver Training

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center
Susan Mazanec, PhD, RN, is leading a study recently granted $2.14 million from the National Cancer Institute to explore new approaches to training and preparing family caregivers of patients with cancer. Dr. Mazanec is a member of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center's Cancer Prevention, Control, and Population Research Program. 
 

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Cancer Moonshot Grant Supports New Approach to Boost Immunotherapies

VCU Massey Cancer Center
While immunotherapies have revolutionized the treatment of many cancers, nearly two-thirds of patients fail to respond to them. Funded by a five-year, $2.1 million National Cancer Institute Cancer Moonshot Grant, VCU Massey Cancer Center scientists Shawn Wang, PhD, and Xianjun Fang, PhD, are combining their expertise in an effort to improve those response rates.
 

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Researcher Receives NIH Grant to Improve Therapy and Detection of Ovarian Cancer

UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center
Alice Soragni, PhD, received a $1.8 million, five-year R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop better ways to treat and detect ovarian cancer. The grant will help Dr. Soragni and her team further investigate the role of a protein called p53, which is commonly mutated in women who have high-grade serous ovarian cancer, the deadliest form of reproductive cancer.
 

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Researchers Seek Culprit in Liver Inflammation

The University of Kansas Cancer Center
A team of researchers at The University of Kansas Cancer Center have been awarded a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study chronic inflammation of the liver, a major factor in the development of liver cancer. Lisa Zhang, PhD, is the principal investigator. Cases of liver cancer have more than tripled since 1980, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide.
 

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Eoff Receives Grant From National Science Foundation

Eoff Receives Grant From National Science Foundation
UAMS Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute
Robert Eoff, PhD, has received a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation to continue his work at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences on DNA damage, cell replication, and its implications for diseases like dementia, ALS, and cancer. Dr. Eoff’s research team studies what happens when DNA damage blocks the mechanics behind how copies of new cells are made. 
 

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$1 Million Awarded to Study Endometrial Cancer

Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center
Angeles Secord, MD, MHSc, has been awarded a four-year, $1 million grant funded by the 2019 Kay Yow Cancer Fund and The V Foundation For Cancer Research to support the project, "Endometrial Cancer Molecularly Targeted Therapy Consortium." The award was made in honor of NBA All-star Kevin Durant's loved one who lost a battle with cancer. 
 

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UMMC Launches Precision Medicine Division, Names Director

UMMC Launches Precision Medicine Division, Names Director
UMMC Cancer Center and Research Institute
Joseph Maher, MD, has been named director of the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) Division of Medical Genetics and Precision Medicine. Dr. Maher also plays a crucial role on several UMMC Cancer Center and Research Institute interdisciplinary teams.
 

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Halene Named Interim Chief of Hematology

Halene Named Interim Chief of Hematology
Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine
Stephanie Halene, MD, PhD, has been named interim chief of hematology at Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital. An associate professor of medicine, Dr. Halene joined the faculty in 2006 after completing her residency and fellowship in hematology at Yale New Haven Hospital and Yale Cancer Center. The cancer center's hematology section includes 18 faculty members focused on patient care and research.  
 

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Biotech Leader Apelian Named BlueSphere Bio CEO

Biotech Leader Apelian Named BlueSphere Bio CEO
UPMC Hillman Cancer Center
BlueSphere Bio, an immunotherapy startup formed by UPMC Enterprises, has announced that David Apelian, MD, PhD, MBA, has been named chief executive officer. He joins clinical immunology experts and company co-founders Mark Shlomchik, MD, PhD, and Warren Shlomchik, MD, of the University of Pittsburgh, to advance the TCXpress platform to develop rapid, personalized T-cell therapies for cancer.
 

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Bradley Named Executive Vice Chairman of Radiation Oncology

Bradley Named Executive Vice Chairman of Radiation Oncology
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University has announced that Jeffrey Bradley, MD, FASTRO, will become the new executive vice chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology. Dr. Bradley joins Winship from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis where he was the clinical director of the Kling Proton Center and chief of the Radiation Oncology Thoracic Cancer Service.
 

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Stefanek to Head Cancer Control, Epidemiology and Disparities

UMMC Cancer Center and Research Institute
Michael Stefanek, PhD, has joined the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) Cancer Center and Research Institute as head of its Cancer Control, Epidemiology and Disparities Program. Dr. Stefanek comes from Augusta University where he chaired and was a professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences, and full member of the Georgia Cancer Center.
 

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Modified Drug Combination May Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence

VCU Massey Cancer Center
Oncologists at VCU Massey Cancer Center were invited to co-author an editorial providing expert commentary on findings from a large study conducted by German investigators suggesting that a modified drug combination may lead to a decreased chance of disease recurrence for women with high-risk, HER2-negative breast cancer.
 

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Team Develops New DNA-Mapping Tool

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center
A scientist at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has developed the first dedicated tool for analyzing a DNA-mapping technology known as ATAC-seq, a technique that identifies the gene "switches" responsible for cancer development and progression. Developed in collaboration with the University at Buffalo, the innovative computational method, named HMMRATAC, could vastly improve current approaches to cancer detection and treatment.
 

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Molecular Sensor Scouts DNA Damage and Supervises Repair

Molecular Sensor Scouts DNA Damage and Supervises Repair
UPMC Hillman Cancer Center
Without vigilant cell repair, cancer would run rampant. Now scientists at the University of Pittsburgh have gotten a glimpse of how one protein in particular keeps DNA damage in check. According to a new study, a protein called UV-DDB—which stands for "ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding"—is useful beyond safeguarding against the sun. Bennett Van Houten, PhD is senior author on the study.
 

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Researchers Find New Details of Immune System Molecular 'Switch'

University of Florida Health Cancer Center
The immune system fights off infections but, in patients with certain medical conditions, it can also become overactive and damage vital organs. Now, a group led by University of Florida Health researcher Dorina Avram, PhD, has found out how one molecular "switch" influences the immune system — a finding they say has major implications for future treatments for immune system diseases and cancer.
 

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Risks of Novel Oral Prostate Cancer Therapies and Pre-Existing Conditions

Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health
A new large population-based study from Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health shows that novel oral androgen signaling inhibitor therapies are associated with an increased risk of death in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions.
 

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UVA Discovers Incredible HULLK That Controls Growth of Prostate Cancer

University of Virginia Cancer Center
Cancer researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have identified a key to controlling the growth and progression of prostate cancer. The researchers have dubbed it "HULLK," a form of RNA that provides the blueprint to produce proteins. But HULLK is a "noncoding" RNA, which means that it isn’t involved in coding a protein. Instead, noncoding RNAs play important roles in regulating biological processes inside our cells. 
 

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New Study Reveals Weakness in Prostate Tumors

New Study Reveals Weakness in Prostate Tumors
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Fred Hutch researchers, led by Andrew Hsieh, MD, have discovered that when aggressive prostate tumors turn off the androgen receptor—their source for growth-fueling hormones—they ramp up a different growth-promoting system. When the scientists targeted this pathway in mouse models, the mice lived longer. The findings, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, could lead to more targeted treatments.
 

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Bacteria on Tumors Influence Immune Response and Survival of Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
A key difference between the few pancreatic cancer patients who survive longterm and the many whose disease overcomes all treatments is the bacterial signatures on their tumors that either stimulate or suppress immune response, a team led by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports.
 

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Discovery of How Cells Override Genetic Changes Could Lead to New Pancreatic Cancer Treatments

Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah
A discovery by scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah could lead researchers to a more effective way to treat pancreatic cancer. Working primarily with mouse models, the researchers introduced cancer-causing mutations into normal cells. When pancreatic cancer occurs, PTF1A is always shut down. Researchers were able to prevent that and found keeping PTF1A on was enough to completely block pancreatic cancer cells from forming. 
 

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New Signal May Provide Basis for Cancer Therapies

New Signal May Provide Basis for Cancer Therapies
Stanford Cancer Institute
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered a new signal that cancers may use to evade detection and destruction by the immune system. The scientists have shown that blocking this signal in mice implanted with human cancers allows immune cells to attack the cancers. Disrupting other "don't eat me" signals has resulted in potential cancer therapies. Irving Weissman, MD, is senior author.

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New Drug Shows Encouraging Survival Results for Pancreatic Cancer

University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center
A clinical trial testing a new pancreatic cancer drug had promising initial results, say University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center researchers. Investigators ran a Phase I clinical trial that looked at AZD1775, an inhibitor designed to block an enzyme called Wee1, which plays a role in repairing damaged DNA. The trial builds on almost 20 years of research at U-M focused on improving the treatment of pancreatic cancer cases that are too advanced for surgery.
 

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Researchers Identify Protein Governing Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

GW Cancer Center
The extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) protein is an important mechanism behind platinum-resistance in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, according to a study from a research team at the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center. The study is the first to provide clinical evidence confirming a link between ERK and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α).
 

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Targeting Cell Division in Pancreatic Cancer

Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health
Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with patients surviving on average less than a year once the disease has spread. The chemotherapeutic agent abemaciclib is effective in treating breast cancer, but there is limited preclinical evaluation of this targeted therapy in treating pancreatic cancer. New research from Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health provides evidence supporting the use of abemaciclib for pancreatic cancer, and suggests new targets that could improve the efficacy of the drug.
 

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Improving the Standard of Therapy for Patients With Intermediate-Risk Neuroblastoma

Improving the Standard of Therapy for Patients With Intermediate-Risk Neuroblastoma
The University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center
The results of a Children’s Oncology Group clinical trial show excellent survival can be maintained in patients with intermediate-risk neuroblastoma—the most common form of cancer in infants under one year old—with reduction of therapy for subsets of neuroblastoma patients. Susan Cohn, MD, was senior author of the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
 

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In-Depth Look at RAS Mutations Highlight Age-Related Molecular Differences in CRC

Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple Health
A new study by researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center provides more evidence that colorectal cancers diagnosed in younger patients may be distinct from those diagnosed in older patients. The research team recently conducted in-depth analysis of the mutational profile of the three RAS oncogenes—KRAS, NRAS, and HRAS—genes that, when mutated, are associated with worse survival outcomes in colorectal cancer.

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New HIV Vaccine Trial to Launch in U.S., Latin America, and Europe

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
An international consortium that includes Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center will begin recruiting thousands of volunteers on three continents in late 2019 for a trial of a vaccine designed to protect people against multiple strains of HIV. The new trial is called Mosaico and was described as a "complementary study" to an ongoing one among women in Africa. Consortium members discussed the trial at the 10th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science in Mexico City.

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New Study Examines Breast Cancer Survivor Experiences Managing Cancer and Work

UK Markey Cancer Center
A new study by University of Kentucky researchers examines breast cancer survivors’ experiences with communicating with their oncology team about employment and work issues. Study leaders conducted 24 qualitative interviews with breast cancer survivors who were working 30 hours per week or more at the time of diagnosis. More than 70 percent of respondents reported no communication or only routine communication with their providers regarding work and employment issues, while 75 percent reported poor or standard communication quality on the topic.
 

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First Clinical Trial Site for High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

First Clinical Trial Site for High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma
GW Cancer Center
GW Cancer Center was selected as the first global site for a clinical trial for patients with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. The study, sponsored by Regeneron in collaboration with Sanofi, will compare disease-free survival of patients treated with adjuvant cemiplimab, versus those treated with placebo after surgery and radiation therapy. Vishal A. Patel, MD, FAAD, FACMS, will lead the study.
 

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Cancer Clinic Closures Limit Access to Care, Increase Medicare Spending

Cancer Clinic Closures Limit Access to Care, Increase Medicare Spending
O'Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham
To better understand the financial impact of cancer clinic closures and travel times on rural Americans, Gabrielle Rocque, MD, evaluated travel time to a cancer care site, known as a CCS, for Medicare beneficiaries age 65 years or older in southeastern states.
 

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Depression, Anxiety Linked to Opioid Use in Women With Breast Cancer

University of Virginia Cancer Center
Elderly women battling breast cancer who have anxiety, depression, or other mental health conditions are more likely to use opioids and more likely to die, a new study led by the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. The findings should encourage doctors to better manage mental health in patients with breast cancer and spur care providers to consider alternative pain management such as physical therapy, massage, and acupuncture, the researchers say.
 

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Recognizing the Toll of Oral Damage From Graft-Versus-Host Disease After Stem-Cell Transplant

Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center
Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) that occurs commonly in the mouth following a stem-cell transplant, but little has been done to effectively treat it, says a team of investigators. Their review of cGVHD, in which donor cells can push the patient’s immune system (host) to attack what it recognizes as "foreign" cells (graft) in the oral cavity, presents the state of the science through an in-depth review of the scientific and clinical importance of this disease, the critical importance of accurate assessment, current pathobiological model, and evidence gaps in our understanding of this disease and treatment effects.
 

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Study Shows Value of Virtual Reality for Pain Management

Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
A new study demonstrates the effectiveness of using virtual reality (VR) to combat pain for hospitalized patients. The study builds on previous work led by Brennan Spiegel, MD, MSHS, who brought VR to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. For the purposes of the new study, researchers conducted a randomized comparative-effectiveness trial. The 120 adults in the study were admitted to Cedars-Sinai for a variety of ailments including orthopedic problems, gastrointestinal diseases, and cancer. All of the patients had an average pain score of at least 3 out of 10 during the 24 hours prior to participating in the study.
 

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Drug Combo Heralds Major Shift in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment

Stanford Cancer Institute
A combination of two drugs keeps patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia disease-free and alive longer than the current standard of care, according to a Phase III clinical trial of more than 500 participants conducted at the Stanford University School of Medicine and multiple other institutions. The results of the trial are likely to change how most people with the common blood cancer are treated in the future, the researchers believe. 
 

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Uncovering Secrets of Bone Marrow Cells and How They Differentiate

Uncovering Secrets of Bone Marrow Cells and How They Differentiate
O'Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham
Research led by Robert Welner, PhD, has now mapped distinct bone marrow niche populations and their differentiation paths for the bone marrow factory that starts from mesenchymal stromal cells and ends with three types of cells — fat cells, bone-making cells, and cartilage-making cells.
 

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Diabetes Symptoms Could Cause Genomic Instability and Lead to Cancer

City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center
Higher-than-normal blood sugar levels are linked to heightened DNA damage that is fixed less often, which could explain why people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing cancer, according to ongoing research led by City of Hope.
 

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Improving Equity in Academic Medicine

Improving Equity in Academic Medicine
University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center
Christina Chapman, MD, studies ways to improve equity in health care systems and the medical workforce to better meet the needs of the population. She served as a discussant on a panel on workplace inequities at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual meeting in Chicago.
 

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Boehringer Ingelheim, MD Anderson Form Virtual Research and Development Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Boehringer Ingelheim and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have announced a new multi-year partnership to conduct collaborative research to rapidly advance therapies for various types of cancers, including gastrointestinal and lung cancers. The establishment of a joint Virtual Research and Development Center will enable effective data sharing and analysis between the organizations.
 

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Chemical Exposure Web Tool Defines Risks Faced by Millions of California Women

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
A new web tool spells out for the first time the exposures that more than 6.5 million working women in California face that could increase their risk for breast cancer, including industrial solvents, antimicrobials, and phthalates. The tool, which was developed by researchers at UC San Francisco and the California Department of Public Health’s Occupational Health Branch, is part of an ongoing study focused on understanding potential breast cancer risks related to workplace chemical exposures.
 

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New E-Cigarette Laws Could Drive Some Users to Smoke More Cigarettes

Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center
Efforts by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and some cities to limit the availability and appeal of e-cigarettes to young users could drive some existing users to smoke more tobacco cigarettes, according to new finding by Duke Health from a survey of 240 young U.S. adults who use both e-cigarettes and traditional tobacco cigarettes.
 

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Fox Chase Launches 'Connected by Cancer' Podcast

Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple Health
Fox Chase Cancer Center launched "Connected by Cancer," a new narrative podcast, on August 20, 2019. The seven-part audio documentary will be updated weekly and is available for free on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and other podcasting platforms. Each episode focuses on a different aspect of life at one of the first comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute, including episodes on patients, doctors, researchers, nurses, and volunteers.
 

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Mammography Bus Screens 20,000th Patient

Mammography Bus Screens 20,000th Patient
WVU Cancer Institute
The Bonnie’s Bus Mobile Mammography Program began its screenings in 2009 through a donation from Jo and Ben Statler. The bus is named in memory of Jo Statler’s mother, Bonnie Wells Wilson, who spent her life in a remote area of the state that lacked access to mammography services. The Statlers wanted to ensure that other families would not lose family members due to a lack of mammography access.
 

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Cancer Center Jobs

Administrative Director, Clinical Research Office
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center
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Clinical Research Manager (two positions)
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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Executive Vice President
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
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Director of Division Operations
Moffitt Cancer Center
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Division Research Operations Manager
Moffitt Cancer Center
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Manager, Clinical Research Budgeting/Finance
GW Cancer Center
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Meeting Announcements

Wendy & Emery Reves International Breast Cancer Symposium

September 20, 2019
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
The Wendy & Emery Reves International Breast Cancer Symposium provides information on the latest laboratory-based translational discoveries and new technologies, while exploring developments in treatment options, clinical trials, and population sciences. 
 
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Multidisciplinary Approaches to Cancer Symposium

October 10, 2019
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Waldorf Astoria, Las Vegas, NV
This intensive program will provide participants with an enhanced ability to interpret and apply best treatment options into their individual cancer practices.
 
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Cancer and Inflammation: From Micro to Macro

October 17, 2019
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH, Bethesda, MD
This two-day national symposium hosted by the CCR Center of Excellence in Immunology addresses recent advances in the field through discussion and debate on the current understanding of cancer and inflammation.
 
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2019 AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting

October 20, 2019
The Mayflower Hotel, Washington, DC
The CME-accredited annual meeting of the Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI) and the Cancer Center Administrators’ Forum (CCAF) provides an opportunity to network with and learn from peers at AACI cancer centers. The meeting will cover topics of both scientific and operational value, providing attendees with practical solutions.
 
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7th Annual AACI Physician Clinical Leadership (PCLI) Meeting

October 20, 2019
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
The Mayflower Hotel, Washington, DC
PCLI is a resource for creating best practices to help cancer center physician clinical leaders, such as chief medical officers and chief physicians, address a range of operational challenges while providing the best patient care. In this session, panelists will discuss initiatives that target health research for sexual and gender minorities and patient financial toxicity, particularly its effect on patient care. 
 
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2019 CAR T Symposium

October 21, 2019
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
The Mayflower Hotel, Washington, DC
The Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI) 2019 CAR T Symposium, in collaboration with Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), aims to identify the key challenges to patient access and delivery of CAR T, and to discuss potential solutions to address barriers to care. 
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AACI Government Relations (GR) Forum

October 21, 2019
2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
The Mayflower Hotel, Washington, DC
The GR Forum provides an opportunity for government relations professionals from AACI member cancer centers to discuss federal and state policy issues that impact the cancer community. The meeting will feature presentations and roundtable discussions covering a variety of topics. Please note: the GR Forum is only open to AACI members.
 
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Artificial Intelligence in Oncology: Advancements and Policy

October 24, 2019
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
The inaugural Artificial Intelligence in Oncology Symposium will bring together experts in AI and machine learning as well as clinical, industry, and federal agency experts in pathology, radiology, oncology, and immuno-oncology to speak on research developments, regulatory policy, reimbursement, and ethics surrounding AI.
 
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Innovators in AYA Cancer: Driving Science and Policy Toward a Brighter Future for Teens and Young Adults With Cancer

November 14, 2019
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
The Case Comprehensive Cancer Center Angie Fowler Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Cancer Research Initiative symposium will engage physicians, practitioners, advocacy organizations, patients and survivors, their families, and caregivers in a conversation about the steps being taken to improve outcomes and address challenges specific to cancer in the AYA population. 

Call for Abstracts
The symposium will feature a poster session and Rising Star oral presentations. All students, postdocs, residents, fellows and faculty conducting research in AYA cancer are invited to submit abstracts. 
The deadline is Friday, October 18, 2019 at 5:00 pm ET. 
 
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