AACI Update | April 2022

Headlines

Jefferson Health Names New Cancer Center Director

Jefferson Health Names New Cancer Center Director

Jefferson Health has named Andrew Chapman, DO, FACP, director of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and executive vice president of oncology services. Dr. Chapman has been serving as the center’s interim director since last year. He began his new position March 15. Jefferson Health President Bruce Meyer, MD, noted that Dr. Chapman's "breadth of experience and expertise, dedication to patient care and success in cancer research made him the ideal fit for this critical role."

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Registration Now Open for AACI/AACR Hill Day

Registration Now Open for AACI/AACR Hill Day

Registration is now open for the 2022 AACI/AACR Hill Day, scheduled for Wednesday, June 15. Participation in the virtual Hill Day is critical to sharing our message with legislators: that stable, predictable funding increases are essential to advancing research and care at our nation’s cancer centers, and a bipartisan commitment to cancer research is saving and improving millions of lives.

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CRI Meeting Registration Open, Program Ads Available

CRI Meeting Registration Open, Program Ads Available

Registration is open for the 14th Annual AACI Clinical Research Innovation (CRI) Meeting, which will be held July 12-14 at the Loews Chicago O'Hare Hotel in Rosemont, IL. This year’s meeting theme, "Partnering in Progress," aligns with CRI's strategic goal of stimulating cancer center interactions to maximize resources by creating opportunities for peer-to-peer networking and collaboration. Cancer centers are also invited to support the meeting by purchasing an ad in the program.

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Mesa Delivers Testimony on Clinical Trial Diversity

Mesa Delivers Testimony on Clinical Trial Diversity On March 17, Ruben A. Mesa, MD, participated in a House Energy and Commerce committee hearing, titled "The Future of Medicine: Legislation to Encourage Innovation and Improve Oversight." The hearing was focused on 22 pieces of legislation to boost biomedical research and innovation, diversify clinical trials, and improve program integrity at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Mesa is a member of AACI's Board of Directors and executive director of Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson.
 

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Patient Resource: an Integral Physician Outreach Tool

Patient Resource: an Integral Physician Outreach Tool Influence of Patient Resource on referrals
  • Over a 3-year period, one cancer center shares a 12% increase of patient referrals year-over-year
  • With more than 48,000 patients surveyed, 83% state that the personalized guides influence their positive recommendation of cancer center to friends & family
For more information, contact Amy Galey.

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News from the Centers

Researchers Elected to American Society for Clinical Investigation

Researchers Elected to American Society for Clinical Investigation
Siteman Cancer Center

Two Washington University physician-scientists at Siteman Cancer Center have been elected members of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Kory Lavine, MD, PhD, and Julie K. Schwarz, MD, PhD, will be inducted April 8.

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Hirsch Receives Hansen Award

Hirsch Receives Hansen Award
The Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai

Fred Hirsch, MD, PhD, received the 2022 Heine H. Hansen Award from the European Society for Medical Oncology in recognition of his lifelong outstanding contribution to lung cancer research. Dr. Hirsch delivered his award lecture on March 30 at the 2022 European Lung Cancer Conference.

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Jeffery Named AAAS Fellow

Jeffery Named AAAS Fellow
University of Illinois Cancer Center

University of Illinois Cancer Center member Constance Jeffery, PhD, has been named a fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She was honored for pioneering contributions to the understanding of multifunctional proteins and outstanding contributions to the training and mentoring of junior scientists.

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Cellular Therapy Program Receives Accreditation

WVU Cancer Institute

The WVU Cancer Institute Cellular Therapy Program was recently awarded its sixth consecutive Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT) reaccreditation for blood and marrow transplant and first FACT accreditation for immune effector cell therapy (CAR T).

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Irish PM Honors McDonnell With National Science Medal

Irish PM Honors McDonnell With National Science Medal
Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center

Donald McDonnell, PhD, associate director for translational research, Duke Cancer Institute, was awarded the Science Foundation Ireland St. Patrick’s Day Science Medal for his work in the development of new treatments for breast and prostate cancers. Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister) Micheál Martin TD presented the award in person to McDonnell at a ceremony in Washington, DC.

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Li Receives Endowed Chair for Breast Cancer Research

Li Receives Endowed Chair for Breast Cancer Research
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center epidemiologist Christopher Li, MD, PhD, was recently selected as the inaugural recipient of the Helen G. Edson Endowed Chair for Breast Cancer Research. Since joining the Hutch faculty in 2002, Dr. Li has studied connections between breast cancer and lifestyle factors as well as ways to overcome health care disparities.

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Pietenpol, Shyr Named AACR Fellows

Pietenpol, Shyr Named AACR Fellows
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) has inducted Jennifer Pietenpol, PhD, and Yu Shyr, PhD, into the 2022 class of Fellows of the AACR Academy.

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Wistar to Be Renamed With $10 Million Gift From Caplan Family

Wistar to Be Renamed With $10 Million Gift From Caplan Family
Ellen and Ronald Caplan Cancer Center of The Wistar Institute

The Wistar Institute announces that Ronald Caplan, founder and president of PMC Property Group, Inc., and his wife Ellen, have donated $10 million to Wistar’s National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Designated Cancer Center, which will be renamed the Ellen and Ronald Caplan Cancer Center of The Wistar Institute.

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Multi-Million Dollar Gift Invests in Expansion of Patient Care

UK Markey Cancer Center

UK HealthCare announced a historic $10 million gift from Central Bank to support expanded patient care at the UK Markey Cancer Center. It is the largest gift in UK HealthCare history and launches an initiative to raise $90 million to improve cancer care in Kentucky.

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American Cancer Society Funds Cancer Health Equity Research Center

American Cancer Society Funds Cancer Health Equity Research Center
University of Illinois Cancer Center

The American Cancer Society awarded the University of Illinois Cancer Center a $4.08 million, four-year grant to establish the Illinois Cancer Health Equity Research Center, a solutions-oriented consortium of health care researchers and clinicians charged with improving outcomes in communities disproportionately affected by cancer. Jan Kitajewski, PhD, directs the cancer center.

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$3.5 Million Grant to Harness Big Data to Help Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

With the aid of a recently awarded $3.5 million, five-year National Cancer Institute grant, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Tufts Medical Center in Boston are collaborating to unify global multi-source big data to enhance clinical decision support for improved outcomes for Hodgkin lymphoma patients.

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Stand Up to Cancer and Southeastern Cancer Centers Fight Racial Inequities in Lung Cancer

VCU Massey Cancer Center

VCU Massey Cancer Center, MUSC Hollings Cancer Center, and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center secured a four-year, $3 million grant from Stand Up To Cancer® (SU2C) that will establish the SU2C Lung Cancer Health Equity Research Team and build on the long-standing community outreach and engagement efforts of these institutions to reduce lung cancer disparities.

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Prevent Cancer Foundation Grant to Focus on Cervical Cancer Disparities

Prevent Cancer Foundation Grant to Focus on Cervical Cancer Disparities
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple Health

Fox Chase Cancer Center’s Suzanne M. Miller, PhD, a professor in the Cancer Prevention and Control research program, has received a two-year research grant from the Prevent Cancer Foundation to support a project designed to test whether text messaging can effectively reduce urban cervical cancer disparities.

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New Deputy Director to Lead Research Initiatives, Organizational Strategy

New Deputy Director to Lead Research Initiatives, Organizational Strategy
WVU Cancer Institute

The WVU Cancer Institute has named Courtney DeVries, PhD, as the new deputy director effective Monday, March 14. She will help lead research initiatives within the Institute. Dr. DeVries joined WVU from Ohio State University, where she was a professor of neuroscience.

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Komanduri Named Chief of Hematology-Oncology

Komanduri Named Chief of Hematology-Oncology
UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Krishna Komanduri, MD, has been named the new chief of the Division of Hematology-Oncology at UCSF Health. Dr. Komanduri will also assume two newly created roles on July 1: physician-in-chief of the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center and clinical director of the UCSF Living Therapeutics Initiative.

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Blank is New President of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology

Blank is New President of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology
The Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai

Stephanie Blank, MD, associate director of women’s cancer for The Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai, has taken on the role of president of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology. She most recently served as a president-elect of the professional organization, which advances the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of gynecologic cancers.

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Graves Joins Sylvester as Assistant Vice President and Associate Director for Administration

Graves Joins Sylvester as Assistant Vice President and Associate Director for Administration
Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Health System

Dorothy Graves, PhD, has been appointed assistant vice president and associate director for administration at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center . She spent five years in her previous leadership role as associate director for administration at UAMS Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute.

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Ragin Named Associate Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Ragin Named Associate Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple Health

Fox Chase Cancer Center has appointed Camille Ragin, PhD, MPH, as associate director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). In this newly created role, Dr. Ragin will be responsible for enhancing hiring practices to encourage diversity, facilitating more diverse leadership at all levels of the institution, providing training and education on race-related issues to the community, and facilitating collaboration.

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Elevated Expertise

Elevated Expertise
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

Surgical oncologist Itzhak Nir, MD, is the founding chief of the new Division of Hepato-Pancreatico-Biliary (HPB) Surgery in the UNM Department of Surgery. The division is housed at UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center and provides state-of-the-art care for liver, pancreas and bile duct-gall bladder diseases.

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Bandera Named Unilever Chair for the Study of Diet and Nutrition in the Prevention of Chronic Disease

Bandera Named Unilever Chair for the Study of Diet and Nutrition in the Prevention of Chronic Disease
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

The Rutgers University Board of Governors voted to approve Elisa Bandera, MD, PhD, an internationally recognized expert in nutrition and cancer epidemiology, as the Unilever Chair for the Study of Diet and Nutrition in the Prevention of Chronic Disease at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey.

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Major Leadership Changes Announced

Major Leadership Changes Announced
Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center

Albert Einstein Cancer Center has announced the appointment of three faculty members to key leadership positions, including new deputy director Ulrich Steidl, MD, PhD, reflecting the center’s commitment to basic science, translational, and clinical research and its core principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

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New Insights Into How Tumors Metabolically Adapt to Their Environment

New Insights Into How Tumors Metabolically Adapt to Their Environment
The University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center

A research team led by Kunle Odunsi, MD, PhD, director of the UChicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center, has discovered novel metabolic mechanisms that contribute to how ovarian cancer escapes from immune attack, and how combination therapies can exploit these pathways to improve ovarian cancer treatment.

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Surprise Discovery Suggests New Treatment for Small-Cell Lung Cancer

University of Virginia Cancer Center

An unexpected discovery at UVA Cancer Center has allowed scientists to halt the development of small-cell lung cancer in lab mice, and the finding could open the door to a new treatment approach. The researchers were seeking to understand the role of a mutation in the EP300 gene in the formation of small-cell lung cancer tumors.

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At-Home Screening Program Aims to Reduce Colorectal Cancer Rates in Black Community

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute

Colorectal cancer experts have launched a new initiative aimed at improving early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer in the Black community, which has historically been placed at increased risk for colorectal cancer due to a lack of timely colorectal cancer screening and barriers to receiving health care services.

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Higher Frequency of Blood Mutations in WTC First Responders

Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center

The collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) following the 9/11 attacks exposed first responders to potential carcinogens. A new study reported results from analyzing genes in blood samples from WTC-exposed first responders and non-WTC exposed firefighters. The research team included scientists from Albert Einstein, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Weill Cornell Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, and Dana Farber Cancer Center.

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Molecule That Kills Pancreatic Cancer Cells Discovered

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

A research team led by scientists at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has discovered a molecule that inhibits the growth and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells through the iron metabolism pathway. Their findings pave the way toward the development of a new drug candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

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Mutation Matchmaking

University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

The UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center has opened the Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry Study, which is sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. It matches drugs that target specific cancer mutations to people whose cancers have those mutations, regardless of where their cancers appear or what type of cancer they have.

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Research Reveals a New Class of Oncogenic Fusions in Lung and Pancreatic Cancer

Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine

A Yale Cancer Center research team has identified novel oncogenic gene fusions in lung and pancreatic cancer, as well as sarcoma. The fusions involve RASGRF1 (an activator of RAS signaling) and promote cellular changes leading to tumor development.

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The Tie Between Taste Bud Receptors and Colorectal Cancer

The University of Kansas Cancer Center

About half of people undergoing chemotherapy report changes to their taste buds, such as a bitter taste in their mouth. Discussions with members of the The University of Kansas Cancer Center’s patient research advocacy program, Patient and Investigator Voices Organizing Together, shed light on the issue.

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FDA Approves New Immunotherapy Regimen for Melanoma Based on Hopkins Research

Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a novel therapy for patients with metastatic or inoperable melanoma. The treatment, developed based on original research conducted at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, is comprised of two immunotherapy agents, relatlimab and nivolumab, which delayed time to cancer progression significantly more than nivolumab alone in a global, multi-center clinical trial.

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Novel Treatment Makes Pancreatic Cancer Susceptible to Immunotherapy

Siteman Cancer Center

A new study in mice suggests that blocking a major inflammatory pathway that is activated in pancreatic cancer makes the tumors sensitive to chemotherapy and a type of immunotherapy that prompts the immune system’s T cells to attack the cancer cells, according to from Washington University researchers at Siteman Cancer Center.

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Study Tests Drug That Targets Tumor Microenvironment

The University of Kansas Cancer Center

Anup Kasi, MD, MPH, is evaluating whether adding a novel agent called CEND-1 helps chemotherapy better permeate cancerous tumors. The Phase I/II investigator-initiated clinical trial, called CENDIFOX, combines CEND-1 and Forfirinox, a standard chemotherapy to treat pancreatic, appendiceal and colorectal cancers.

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Computational Approach Enables Spatial Mapping of Single-Cell Data Within Tissues

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

A new computational approach developed by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center successfully combines data from parallel gene-expression profiling methods to create spatial maps of a given tissue at single-cell resolution. The resulting maps can provide unique biological insights into the cancer microenvironment and many other tissue types.

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For Glioblastoma, a New Clinical Trial Fosters Innovation and Hope

University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center

A new clinical trial from a team at the Rogel Cancer Center uses innovative basic science research methods to offer hope and a new treatment to glioblastoma patients. A team of Rogel physicians led by Daniel Wahl, MD, PhD, hopes that grounding their trial in rigorous and innovative biology from the very beginning will help this approach succeed where so many other potential glioblastoma treatments have failed.

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New Pathogenic Mechanism in Hematological Malignancies Discovered

Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine

Scientists at Yale Cancer Center have discovered new consequences of specific gene mutations that play a role in the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The new research revealed that mutations in the splicing factor U2AF1 improve the ability of the cancer cells to respond to and survive stress.

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Researchers Identify Gene That Predicts Breast Cancer Patient Treatment Outcomes

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

A multidisciplinary team of researchers from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center and Kaiser Permanente Northern California have identified the first pharmacogenomic marker for anthracyclines and HER2-targeting drugs, two commonly used breast cancer chemotherapies.

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Study Estimates One in Seven U.S. Breast Cancers May Be Over-Diagnosed

Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center

About one in seven breast cancers detected by mammography screening are over-diagnosed, according to a Duke Cancer Institute study designed to clarify the risk of breast cancer over-diagnosis using contemporary screening technology in the U.S. The study should inform decision-making about mammography screening for women aged 50 and older.

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Treating Tough Tumors by Exploiting Their Iron Addiction

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Researchers at UC San Francisco have successfully leveraged an FDA-approved drug to halt growth of tumors driven by mutations in the RAS gene, which are famously difficult to treat and account for about one in four cancer deaths. Taking advantage of what they discovered to be the cancer cells’ appetite for a reactive form of iron, the researchers tweaked an anticancer drug to operate only in these iron-rich cells, leaving other cells to function normally.

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Analysis: Impact of Chronic Lower Extremity Lymphedema on Older Female Cancer Survivors

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute

A new study has found that nearly one third of older adult female survivors of colorectal, endometrial, and ovarian cancer have quality of life-impacting challenges with physical activity due to lymphedema in the lower extremities. This is the first study to assess lower lymphedema in colon cancer survivors.

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Scientists Target Protein to Lower Risk of Prostate Cancer Spread

Cedars-Sinai Cancer

Targeting a specific protein that is often overexpressed in prostate cancer can help prevent or delay the disease from spreading to other parts of the body, according to a study led by Cedars-Sinai Cancer investigators. The research opens the possibility of using available commercial drugs, including one approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for leukemia, to shut down a protein known as receptor-interacting protein kinase 2.

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Skin Cancer Cells Use an Alzheimer's Disease Protein to Sabotage Immune Defenses

Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone

Amyloid beta, a protein known to build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease, also helps skin cancer cells thrive when they spread to the brain, a new study finds. The study found that in melanoma, cancer cells that have spread to the brain depend on amyloid beta to survive there.

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Study Finds Cancer Treatment Creates Employment Difficulties for Some Rural Women

UAMS Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute

Rural women are likely to face significant challenges finding secure and reliable employment following cancer treatment if they did not already have a secure job at the time of their diagnosis, according to a new study led by University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) researchers.

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Long-Elusive Structure of Key Cellular-Signaling Molecule Found

Stanford Cancer Institute

For more than 25 years, researchers around the world have been trying to find the structure of Janus kinases, or JAKs, a class of proteins that play a key role in cellular signaling and that have been tied to many cancers. Now, Stanford School of Medicine researchers have learned the architecture of one of these proteins.

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New Methods Outlined to Identify Personalized Drug Treatments for Breast Cancer

Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah

For years, researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute have honed a process of developing breast cancer models using tumors donated by breast cancer patients, which they then implant into mice to study the tumor’s behavior. Now, the team reports a new, more efficient way to grow these tumors, and they outline a process to test potential drugs to help prioritize clinical therapy choices based on unique tumor characteristics.

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Promising Approach Against Treatment-Resistant Cancer

Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center

A research team led by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine has devised a novel and highly promising strategy for overcoming a key cause of cancer deaths: the ability of cancer cells to thrive in the face of chemotherapy drugs designed to destroy them.

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Study: Art at the Bedside of Cancer Patients is Good Medicine

Wilmot Cancer Institute, UR Medicine

The simple distraction of looking at art and discussing it helped bring calm to a group of patients at the Wilmot Cancer Institute. The results of a randomized clinical trial show that anxiety was significantly lower among patients who viewed art at the bedside.

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Cerebrospinal Fluid May Be Able to Identify Aggressive Brain Tumors in Children

Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University

It may be possible to identify the presence of an aggressive brain tumor in children by studying their cerebrospinal fluid, according to new research led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators. Comparing cerebrospinal fluid samples from 40 patients with medulloblastoma and from 11 healthy children without the disease, investigators identified 110 genes, 10 types of RNA, 14 lipids, and several metabolites that were expressed differently between the two groups.

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Cancer Drugs Might Be Able to Target Tuberculosis, Study Finds

Stanford Cancer Institute

An unexpected link between tuberculosis and cancer may lead to new drug treatments for the bacterial disease, according to a study led by researchers at Stanford Medicine. The study found that granulomas in the lungs of people with active tuberculosis infections are packed with proteins known to tamp down the body’s immune response to cancer cells or infection.

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Study Examines Kentucky Lung Cancer Disparities

UK Markey Cancer Center

A recent UK Markey Cancer Center study gives more insight into how lung cancer differs in Kentucky compared to other U.S. populations. The research shows that Kentucky has more late-stage diagnoses and worse lung cancer survival rates compared to other states.

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First Freestanding Cancer Center in Chicago Proposed

First Freestanding Cancer Center in Chicago Proposed
The University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center

The University of Chicago Medicine plans to build a $633 million, 500,000-square-foot facility dedicated to cancer care on its medical campus on the city’s South Side. Kunle Odunsi, MD, PhD, is center director. Photo: Tom Rossiter.

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Crowdfunding Helps Pay the Bills During Cancer, But at a Price

University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center

Crowdfunding has become a means for people with cancer to get help managing the financial impact of their disease. But while there’s relief in paying bills, a new study finds that it comes at a cost: a sense of shame and stigma from asking for help and revealing personal health details. The issue is particularly critical for young adults with cancer, an understudied group that faces distinct needs.

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An Advanced Monitoring Platform Enhances Safety, Precision in Spine Tumor Treatment

Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone

The Brain and Spine Tumor Center at NYU Langone’s Perlmutter Cancer Center is now using ExacTrac Dynamic, a patient positioning and monitoring system that helps the spine tumor team address the challenge of patient movement during stereotactic body radiation therapy.

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Cancer Center Jobs

Administrative Officer - Research
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center
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Clinical Research Monitor
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
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Clinical Research Data Analyst
Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Health
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Associate Director of Administration
Legorreta Cancer Center at Brown University
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Faculty Position - Precision Medicine
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
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Manager of Administrative Services
Dartmouth Cancer Center
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Multiple Positions
The University of Arizona Cancer Center
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Regulatory Coordinator
Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center
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Research Nurse Coordinator II - Cancer Clinical Trials Office
Cedars-Sinai
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Clinical Research Supervisor
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
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Associate Dean, Research and Clinical Trials
Cedars-Sinai
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Associate Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
OHSU Knight Cancer Institute
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Associate Director, Education & Training
Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center
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Clinical Research Associate
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
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Manager, Data Analytics
UCI Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
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Meeting Announcements

Equity by Design in Clinical Research: Cancer Trials

March 8, 2022
Webinar Series, Dana-Farber / Harvard Cancer Center, MA

Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard (MRCT Center), in partnership with the Center for Cancer Equity and Engagement, Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, present Equity by Design in Clinical Research: Cancer Trials.

The weekly webinar series will be held from 4:30 to 6:00 pm ET, March 8 through April 14. Click below for more details and registration information.

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Annual Midwest Tumor Microenvironment Meeting

May 23, 2022
University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS

7th Midwest Tumor Microenvironment Meeting at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS

Sponsors:
NIH NCI
The University of Kansas Cancer Center
KU Cancer Biology
KU Otolaryngology
School of Medicine Bohan Visiting Professor Program

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LGBTQ+ Cancer Symposium

June 2, 2022
Sofitel Los Angeles at Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, CA

This symposium is the first of its kind to center the science and voices of LGBTQ+ people on cancer care, community engagement and policies that influence health disparities. Cedars-Sinai Cancer’s mission recognizes that by examining the intersection of sexual orientation, gender and cancer, we can better prevent, detect and cure cancer.

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AACI/AACR Virtual Hill Day

June 15, 2022
Virtual Meeting

Save the date for the 2022 AACI/AACR Virtual Hill Day. More details to come.

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14th Annual AACI CRI Meeting

July 12, 2022
Loews Chicago O'Hare Hotel, 5300 N. River Rd., Rosemont, IL 60018

The health and safety of meeting attendees is of paramount importance. AACI continues to closely monitor the COVID-19 pandemic and related public health guidelines. We are currently planning for an in-person event, July 12-14, at the Loews Chicago O’Hare Hotel, and will implement protective measures in accordance with current guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the City of Chicago. 

Meeting Policies and FAQ

Can I register with a group of colleagues at a discounted rate? No. Group registrations were available only to attendees of the 2021 virtual CRI meeting. Since we are planning an in-person meeting this year, we are providing the same registration options available for previous in-person meetings.

Will there be an option to attend this meeting virtually? For those who are unable to attend the meeting in person, AACI will provide a virtual option. To register as a virtual attendee, select the "Member - Virtual Only" registration type. This will give you access to all sessions held in the main ballroom. Login information will be provided closer to the meeting. 

Do I need to be vaccinated to attend the CRI meeting? Yes. Proof of full vaccination will be requested at registration and when checking in to the meeting. No attendee will be permitted to pick up their badge without submitting proof of vaccination status. In the event that an attendee is not fully vaccinated or does not disclose their vaccination status at registration, they will be required to present a negative PCR test result upon entering the event and must wear a mask throughout the duration of the meeting. The PCR test must be taken 72 hours before the start of the meeting. “Full vaccination,” as defined by the CDC, means a person has received their primary series (two doses) of an approved COVID-19 vaccine (Moderna or Pfizer) or a single dose of the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine; boosters are not required for attendance. 

What is the CRI meeting mask policy? AACI will require anyone of undisclosed or incomplete vaccination status to wear a high-quality mask (N95 or KN95 preferred) throughout the meeting. A mask must completely cover your mouth and nose and may be removed only briefly for eating and drinking. 
Do I need to take a COVID test before entering the meeting? If an attendee is not fully vaccinated or does not disclose their vaccination status, they will be required to present the result of a PCR test taken 72 hours before the meeting. Fully vaccinated attendees are not required to present test results. However, any attendees, regardless of vaccination status, should refrain from attending the meeting if they have knowingly been exposed to COVID-19 or are experiencing any symptoms. If an attendee is already on-site and experiencing symptoms, they should be tested as soon as possible and remain in their hotel room. 

AACI reserves the right to revise vaccination, masking, and testing policies based on evolving public health recommendations, and will notify attendees of any changes as soon as possible.

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2022 AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting

October 2, 2022
InterContinental at the Plaza, 401 Ward Pkwy., Kansas City, MO 64112

Save the date for the 2022 AACI/CCAF Annual Meeting. More details to come.

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